Tag Archives: Astronomical Observatory

New POI on Ramar map: Karahunj, Stonehenge of Armenia

Zorats Karer, also known as Karahunj is often referred to as the Armenian Stonehenge. The site is rich with stone settings, burial cists and standing stones – Menhirs. In total registered 223 stones. The heights of the stones range from 0.5 to 3 m (above ground) and weight up to 10 tons.

Link to the RAMAR Mystery POI

Hundreds of over 2000 Year old Earthworks found in the Amazon

Credit: Jennifer Watling

The Amazonian rainforest was transformed over two thousand years ago by ancient people who built hundreds of large, mysterious earthworks.

The ditched enclosures, in Acre state in the western Brazilian Amazon, were concealed for centuries by trees. Modern deforestation has allowed the discovery of more than 450 of these large geometrical geoglyphs.

The function of these mysterious sites is still little understood — they are unlikely to be villages, since archaeologists recover very few artefacts during excavation. The layout doesn’t suggest they were built for defensive reasons. It is thought they were used only sporadically, perhaps as ritual gathering places. Read more

Ancient Earthworks of Ukraine May Be the Biggest Solar Observatory in the World

Ancient Earthworks  in the Ukraine may be the biggest Solar Observatory in the World.

Ancient Earthworks in the Ukraine may be the biggest Solar Observatory in the World.

More than thirty man-made hills with different forms were located in an area of about twenty square kilometers. And the hills are not scattered randomly. They are organized by mathematical proportions and create the sacred geometry of Bezvodovka.

Ancient astronomers could use the observatory, not only as a solar calendar and for holding associated religious rites, but also as a tool to calculate the lunar cycle known as the Meton cycle, as well as to study the motion of the planets and stars in the sky. Long-term observation of the motion of celestial bodies, and knowledge of the laws of celestial mechanics, allowed the determination of the date of the lunar and solar eclipses and even the displacement of the equinoxes on the horizon due to variations in the Earth’s axis called precession. Read more

The world’s oldest observatory? How Aboriginal astronomy provides clues to ancient life!

These rocks are thought to have once marked the sun's journey throughout the year  [Credit: ABC: Hamish Fitzsimmons]

These rocks are thought to have once marked the sun’s journey throughout the year [Credit: ABC: Hamish Fitzsimmons]

An ancient Aboriginal site at a secret location in the Victorian bush could be the oldest astronomical observatory in the world, pre-dating Stonehenge and even the Great Pyramids of Giza. Scientists studying the Wurdi Youang stone arrangement say it could date back more than 11,000 years and provide clues into the origins of agriculture.”Some academics have referred to this stone arrangement here as Australia’s version of Stonehenge,” Dr Hamacher said.

“I think the question we might have to ask is: is Stonehenge Britain’s version of Wurdi Youang? Because this could be much, much older.” If the site is more than 7,000 years old, it will rewrite history and further disprove the notion that first Australians were uniformly nomadic hunter-gatherers. Scientists believe the arrangement of stones was able to map out the movements of the sun throughout the year. Read more